Archive

Category Archives for "Eat"

How to Cut Tri-Tip Steak

Though it comes from the toughest muscle on the cow, tri-tip steak is delicious and it requires good marinade.

However, some people do not know how to cut this steak or whether to cut it cooked or not. As such, this post gives you some tips that can help you to cut the tri steak to serve your guests.

Tri-Tip is a cut of meat that is obtained from a cow and it comes in a triangular shape. The right side is shorter than the left side upon closer inspection.

There are only two tri-tip cuts that can be obtained per each cow. You can also recognize the seams of fat that run from the top to the bottom on this cut of meat.

The meat is popular among many people and they often experience about how to cut it. Other characteristics of tri-tip include low-fat content, has two different directions of fibers of beef, rich in flavor and very tender. This type of meat is also found in only specialized butchers since it is very rare.

Should You Cut the Meat Cooked or Uncooked?

how to cut tri tip roast into steaks

Many people wonder whether it is proper to cut the meat before it is cooked or after. It is recommended that it is best to cut the meat after it has been cooked. To cook tri-tip steak, you must use an open pit with live or red oak chips. 

Before cooking the meat, you can rub garlic powder, salt, pepper and you can serve it with macaroni salad, pinquito beans as well as garlic bread. You must cook the meat at 130 to 135 degrees F but the center is thick hence it can remain with a pinkish color.

When cooking is done, leave the meat to rest for 15 minutes so that the juices can settle. If you rush into cutting the meat, you can end up with dry steak after the juices escape.

When the meat is ready for cutting, you need the following items:

  • A sharp knife and fork
  • Cutting board
  • Serving platter

A wet towel under the cutting board is also essential to prevent it from moving. This is a safety precaution meant to protect you against any harm. It is recommended that you should cut the tri-tip steak into thin slices for easy chewing and making it tenderer.

Each cut of tri-tip steak usually weighs up to 1.5 to 2.5 pounds and it can serve about three or four people. If you are serving the meat along with sandwiches, then you can serve more than four people.

How to Cut Tri-Tip

how to cut tri-tip steak against the grain

Cutting tri-tip can just be confusing but it is not a very difficult task to do.

The first thing that you should do is to cut the meat into two halves. You should be guided by the direction of the grains on the meat. On each half, the grains run in the opposite direction.

The seams usually run in straight lines from top to bottom and your first cut should dissect the tri-tip into half. You should further establish how the seams run after dividing the steak into half.  You can start by cutting the first half and make sure that you do it in a perpendicular line to the seam.  

This particular method where you cut the steak perpendicular to the seam lines is also called cutting against the grains. The method is ideal in that it helps to maximize the tenderness of the meat. When you finish cutting the first half, you should also identify the grain from the seam on the second cut.

best way to cut tri tip steak

You can repeat the same action that you performed on the first half to the second cut. You should always cut on the bias and be able to identify how much the seam changes on the second cut of the tri-tip.

When you follow the perpendicular line strategy to the seam when cutting the tri-tip steak, you will realize that it gives you thin slices that are tender.

If you do not cut the meat after cooking, it can be difficult to chew and it can also lose its flavor. It is essential that you cut the meat into thin slices that are easy to chew. You should always bear in mind that cutting a tri tip follows a follows a particular direction.

The underlying thing when you decide to buy tri-tip steak is that it is rare and there are only two cuts on each cow. When cooking this type of meat, you can use a variety of recipes that satisfy your needs.

how to cut a tri tip into individual steaks

Cooking is not an issue but cutting the tri-tip steak can be confusing hence the need to know the skill of performing the task.

A Comprehensive Guide About the Different Types of Grills

Are you considering purchasing a grill?

Then, you might realize that there are different grills that you can choose from. The problem is that you need to make sure that you know the different type of grills and you should make sure that you know which one is going to be best for you. This is the full guide about the different types of grills. So that you can make sure that you choose the right one.

Gas grill

Gas grill

This is the most popular backyard grill. This is mostly because it is easy to use.  These gas grills run on propane gas or natural gas. The gas isn’t that expensive to refill. You should look for the best gas grill for outdoor BBQ parties or indoors.

It is great for those people that are looking for a grill that you can set up and use immediately. No more waiting for the charcoal to heat up and no more charcoal clean up afterward. Maintenance is a bit more expensive, because of all the valves and gas that needs to be refilled and maintain. The taste of the meat isn’t like the normal BBQ smokey taste, because there isn’t any smoke involved. You can choose between different sizes and different quality. Some are really expensive, while other gas grillers are more affordable.

Charcoal grill

Charcoal grills are those grills that are the traditional way of Barbequing. It gives the great smoking taste, is great to enjoy family time while you are preparing the grill for the BBQ.  Maintenance is really cheap, but cleanup will take a bit longer than with the gas grill.

This is a great grill for those that are looking for the traditional BBQ. The smell of charcoal and the taste of the BBQ meat. The thing that people don’t like about the charcoal grill is the fact that you always need to have charcoal at hand. And, it can take a bit longer to start grilling the meat. Cleaning the grill afterward is also taking a bit longer than with the gas and electric grill. Buying the charcoal grill is cheaper than with the gas grill and the electric grill. But, you need to remember the added costs of the charcoal every time you are barbequing.

Electric grill

Electric grill

If you are looking for an electric grill, you need to make sure that you know that you are getting an indoor and outdoor grill. With this grill, you don’t need to have gas or charcoal to be able to BBQ. However, electricity can be costly if you are barbequing a lot.

This is a great option if you are living in an area where you are prohibited from grilling on gas or charcoal. It is safer and easier to use as well.  When you are using an electric grill, you should know that the smokey taste will be lost. This is because electricity can’t produce smoke and fire. It is easier and faster to clean, and maintenance is a lot cheaper. The thing that you should know is that it is more expensive and you are able to purchase cheaper and more expensive versions.

Things to consider when choosing your grill

There are a couple of things that you should consider when you are choosing your grill. What taste do you want at the end of the day? Do you want the smokey taste or just want to BBQ with friends and family, and doesn’t mind the smokey-less meat?

The maintenance cost is also really important to consider. With the gas grill, the maintenance costs are the highest. The charcoal grill takes a longer time to clean and the electric grill can give you high utility bills.  The price is also really important to consider. You want to take your budget into consideration, but you want to have a grill that is going to last and that will be value for money. The cheaper the grill, the lower the quality will be.

The last thing that you should consider is if you are looking for a portable grill that you can take with you when you are going on holiday. Or, if you are looking for a grill that you can only use at home. Gas grills are hard to transport, because of the different equipment that you need to take with you.

With this guide to the different types of grills, it will be easier to decide which one you should consider. And, you will know the benefits and problems that you can expect with each grill. This guide is making it easier to know the maintenance costs, what the meat can taste like and what experience you want from the grill.

Do you want to have a quick BBQ, or are you looking to spend some time with family while you are barbequing? It is a lot easier to choose your grill if you know the different types of grills.

Jerusalem Village: A Shabbat Come True

Last Friday I experienced something that I never thought would happen to me so early in life- a private chef came to my house and cooked an entire Shabbat meal for me and 10 guests. Is this a joke? No. This is reality, people.

Thanks to Jerusalem Village, an organization based in Jerusalem that helps young people connect to each other through interesting events and groups, I was able to invite 4 friends and 6 strangers into my house for a night of food, drinks and many laughs. The concept behind it is to get new “olim” (immigrants) and native Israelis to meet over a shared Shabbat experience in an intimate atmosphere.

When I heard this- I jumped on the offer. Jerusalem Village provides the ingredients, the chef, and even a portable kosher kitchen- great for me since the kitchen I have now isn’t kosher and I always want to invite my more religious friends, but can’t. Thursday night the food was delivered, and early Friday morning we got to cooking. For 6 hours. Naturally, we started drinking early.

elad
pamelo2
beetgrated
rollinggrapeleaves
arak
supplies
greens
rollinganddrinking
arak2

the menu for the evening- drum roll please…

The Menu:

  • Beet Root Soup
  • Stuffed Grape Leaves
  • Fennel and Pear Salad
  • Sprouts Salad
  • Sea Bass Patties in a Spicy Pepper Sauce
  • Homemade CousCous
  • Red lentil + Pumpkin curry

And while I’m looking forward to hearing from Orit Bon Apetite (the chef who graciously came over and planned an exquisite meal) about the specific recipes, I can’t actually speak to them right now as I was strictly the sous chef. It was so nice not having to worry, but just be a helping hand. And so while I can now roll grape leaves like a mother fucker, I can’t really say what the exact recipe is- yet.

In the meantime, here’s a classic recipe for an Israeli night cap, or as one Israeli guest described it as: Israeli water!

Arak Recipe

  1. Take a whiskey glass and pop in one large ice cube
  2. Pour one shot of arak (anise liquor)
  3. Garnish with a mint sprig

Viola- you’re now Israeli!

**If you or someone you know is looking for an unforgettable experience, I would highly recommend both Jerusalem Village as well as Orit Bon Apetite for a more private or intimate occasion. Seriously people, she makes miracles happen in the kitchen.

How to Make Malabi – Middle Eastern Orchid Pudding

What is Malabi?

Malabi is a Middle Eastern pudding traditionally made with orchid root and milk and topped with shredded coconut, cinnamon, nuts or in this case- goji berries. It is basically sahlav, cold and turned into pudding format.

What you really need to know is that once you make the magical drink of sahlav, you can stick the leftovers in the fridge (preferably in adorable tiny teacups) and have pudding for breakfast the next morning.

“In Jerusalem, before the days of coke and lattes, tamarind drink and soos (made from licorice twig) were the typical refreshing summer beverages; their winter counterpart was sachlav”

I got this recipe, like most other things I’m cooking up these days from the Jerusalem cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sammi Tamimi- if I haven’t said it yet: go out and get this cookbook. It’s been on countless gift guides across the web, and really, what foodie wouldn’t want such a gorgeous cookbook?

~

  • 50 grams cornflour
  • 500 ml milk
  • 200 ml water
  • 80 g caster sugar (I used demura, and it was fine)
  • 25 g desiccated coconut, to garnish

Whisk cornflour together with 100 ml of the milk to make a paste. Pour the remaining milk, water, and sugar into a saucepan and heat so that the sugar dissolves. When the mixture begins to release steam, whisk in the cornflour paste. Continue to whisk until it turns into a thick custard. Remove from heat and pour into your holder of choice: wine or champagne glasses make for a classy dessert. For a more homey feel pour into tea cups like above. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Garnish with coconut/ nuts/ cinnamon/ berries- whatever you like!

Olive Oil Cake With Rosemary + Dark Chocolate

January 2013 has been quite the roller coaster ride. I started three (yes, you read that correctly) new jobs, I’m moving apartments, my website re-design launched, and I’m still trying to keep this little ol’ blog running smoothly. While I’m definitely counting my blessings, I’ve also had zero time to myself.

thoughts

And so, on Tuesday, when the elections were happening in this country, and I found myself with a day off from work- I knew it was time to bake. I’ve been doing pretty well on my resolutions list – listening to episodes of This American Life and The Moth, are pretty easy- getting my finances in order is a slower process, but with the help of Ramit, I’m on my way.

say hello

I read about this recipe for olive oil cake from Kim Boyle’s Good to the Grain cookbook via Heidi awhile back. It intrigued me so much- olive oil? In a cake? As you know by now, I’m a huge fan of olive oil– I wrote my freakin senior thesis about it.

70 percent
rose and mary

So as the gods has aligned it to be, I was set up with some time to myself to finally breathe, beautiful weather (which, by the way, totally affects my mood), and all of the right ingredients. Rosemary from my container garden, Trader Joes dark chocolate brought from my lovely boyfriend on his recent trip back home, and even artisan olive oil from a farm in the North. It was time.

knife me
chunky

I hope this cake makes you as happy as it has made me. The rosemary gives it a really nice subtle flavor, and with big chunks of quality chocolate, as well as smaller shavings- the chocolate permeates throughout the cake. Bring it to a potluck or savor it for a few days in the morning with a cup of tea. I wish you all a relaxing weekend- take some time for yourself, and if you can, try an olive oil cake to match your happy mood.

~

Rosemary + Dark Chocolate Olive Oil Cake
Recipe adapted from Kim Boyle’s Good to the Grain 

Dry ingredients:
3/4 cup spelt flour
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

Wet ingredients:
3 eggs
1 cup olive oil (the better quality olive oil you have, the more of that flavor will come out in the cake)
3/4 cup milk (I used organic soy milk)

1 1/2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped – give or take, I think a bit more next time would be lovely
5 ounceschocolate (70% cacao), chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
2 tablespoons sugar for top crunch

  1. Preheat the oven to 350F and either coat a loaf pan with olive oil or line it with parchment paper.
  2. Mix the dry ingredients in a large bowl and set aside.
  3. In another bowl, whisk the eggs and add in the olive oil, milk and rosemary.
  4. Using a spatula, fold the wet ingredients into the dry until just combined. Stir in the chocolate.
  5. Pour the batter into your pan and sprinkle the top with sugar (if you like). It gives the cake a nice crunch on top.
  6. Bake for about 50 minutes, until the top is golden brown and you can insert a skewer into the center and it comes out clean.

Serves 8 -12.

Prep time: 15 min – Cook time: 50 min

up close

13 Reasons to Eat Local

In case you have some spare time whilst awaiting impending doom a la the Sandy variety – here’s a list of 13 reasons why you should eat local. This list comes from the book, The 100 Mile Diet, which I read this past summer.

If you’re looking for an interesting read about one couple’s journey into eating local food (within a 100-mile radius of their home in British Columbia, Canada) for an entire year- definitely check out this book. Thoroughly enjoyable, and not pretentious at all. They ate potatoes for like, months. That’s commitment right there.

13 reasons to eat local (from the authors of The 100 Mile Diet):

  1. Taste the difference- most local produce found at farmers markets has been harvested inside of 24 hours. It comes to you ripe, fresh, and full of flavor- unlike supermarket fruits and veggies that may have been picked weeks or even months, before. Close to home crop varieties can also be selected for taste rather than durability because they don’t have to withstand the abuse of shipping or industrial harvesting.
  2. Know what you’re eating- buying food today is complicated. What pesticides were used on this tomato? Is that corn genetically modified? Was that chicken free-range or did it grow up in a cage? People who eat locally are closer to the south of their food and can actually ask these questions. They can build relationships with farmers whom they trust. And when in doubt, they can drive out to the farms and see for themselves.
  3. Meet your neighbors- local eating is social. Studies show that people shopping at farmers markets have ten times as many conversations as their counterparts who shop at the supermarket. Join a community garden and you’ll actually meet people you pass on the street in your neighborhood.
  4. Get in touch with the seasons- when you eat locally, you eat what’s in season. Youll remembers that cherries are the taste of the summer. Even in winter, comfort foods like squash soup and pancakes just make sense- a lot more than flavorless cherries from the other side of the world.
  5. Discover new flavors- ever tried sunchokes? How about purslane, quail eggs, yerba mora, or tayberries? These are just a few of the new flavors you could eat by eating locally. Count the types of pears on offer at your supermarket. Maybe three? Four? That is just the tip of the iceberg. Small farms are keeping alive nearly 300 varieties- while more than 2000 have been lost in our rush to conformity.
  6. Explore your community- visiting local farms is a way to be a tourist on your own home turf, with plenty of stops for snacks.
  7. Save the world- A study in Iowa found that a regional diet consumed 17 times less oil and gas than a typical diet based on food shipped across the country. The ingredients for a typical British meal, sourced locally, traveled 66 times fewer food miles. In many places, low-carbon farming is beginning to bring food to local farmers markets with minimal fossil fuel use in every part of the cycle. Think of eating locally as your own personal carbon offset.
  8. Support small farms- there is new life being breathed into the family farm in areas with bustling local markets, strengthening the regional economy and anchoring communities. That’s a whole lot better than the jobs at Wal-Mart and fast-food outlets that the globalized economy offers in North American towns.
  9. Give back to the local economy- a British study tracked how much of the money spent at a local food business stayed in the local economy, and how many times it was reinvested. The total value was almost twice the contribution fo a dollar spent at a supermarket chain.
  10. Be healthy- many people want to know whether the 100-mile diet works as a weight loss program. The question has not seriously studied, but according to the authors, it seems that most people do lose weight eating local foods. More importantly, though, people often feel better than ever. They eat more vegetables and fewer processed products, sample a wider variety of foods, and eat more fresh food at its nutritional peak. When eating from farmers markets and cooking from scratch, there’s rarely a need to count calories.
  11. Create memories- a night spend making jam with friends is more fun than hunkering down in the dark with the latest Hollywood blockbuster. Cooking and eating with family and friends is, and always has been, an integral part of our social network.
  12. Have more fun while traveling- once you’re addicted to local eating, you’ll want to explore it wherever you go- a catalyst for this blog, actually.
  13. And always remember… everything about food and cooking is a metaphor for sex.

Do you have any more reasons to add? Please share your tips on why eating local is great in the comments!

Wine Merchant Guest Post

Today we have a guest post from Lisa over at Wine Telegraph to give us an education about wine. Hope you enjoy!

Experts in Food and Drink –  Seven Reasons to Shop With Your Local Wine Merchants

The role of wine merchants is rarely confined just to providing an avenue for the purchase and consumption of wine. Modern wine merchants are about enabling the whole experience – from widening choice in wine buying to finding the foods and equipment that make the experience of enjoying fine eating and drinking complete.

There are plenty of reasons to shop with a local wine merchant – here are seven of the best.

food and drink

 1: Expertise

Wine merchants offer expertise you can’t get in a supermarket. This is as much a function of the purpose of each establishment as it is of the specific knowledge of individual shop assistants. A wine merchant is there to give information and expertise in addition to product – while a supermarket is there simply to offer choice on a shelf.

While a supermarket wine department may aim to direct the customer using shelf tags, a merchant is there to deliver in depth recommendations after consultation and exploration.

 2: Variety

No shop that sells lots of other things can hope to match the variety of wine and wine-related accoutrements in the merchant’s emporium. No supermarket, for example, can offer the range of independent alternatives in lower price brackets that the merchant provides.

 3: Price Breaks

A wine merchant often sells wine by the case only – so the minimum purchase is usually either six or twelve bottles. In either case, there’s often a price break when bottles are purchased according to specific rules – for example, if six or more of the same wine is bought then the merchant may sell each bottle for less than if the case is made up of six different wines.

 4: Delivery

The merchant is usually happy to deliver, because he or she is selling wine by the case rather than by the bottle. Larger merchants usually have a weekly delivery day for individual towns or postal areas. In city areas, a merchant may even operate daily deliveries. As a result, it’s possible to go in and shop in person for large quantities of wine without having to worry about getting it all home again.

 5: Complementary Food and Drink

The merchant is there to make the customer’s experience of good wine better. To this end, he or she may either directly sell, or facilitate the sale of, food that complements the wine in question. During specific seasons, these services often extend to the creation nor ordering of hampers; or the facilitation of ordering festive boards and festive meats, which will go well with the festive wines being sold.

A merchant may also directly sell a number of snack foods designed to complement his or her selections of wine. If a customer is having a party, he or she may therefore be able to offer all drinks and nibble scattering from under a single roof.

 6: Information

There’s a difference between expertise and information – expertise allows the customer to be guided directly to wines that will serve a required purpose, while information helps the customer to expand his or her palate through his or her own journey of discovery. Again, the merchant is much better placed to deliver this kind of information – which may range from simple inquiries about wines from specified regions of the world; to more complex requests for information about whether any animal products or animal related products have been used in the creation of each wine.

 7: Wine Furniture

A merchant may also supply the wine furniture required for the storage and enjoyment of the wines he or she sells. Wine furniture isn’t just a wine rack or cabinet – the term also refers to bottle openers and serving receptacles.

5 Ways to Eat Locally and Healthfully

Today we have an awesome guest post from Shelly Stinson, about five easy ways to eat more healthfully and locally – my two favorite things! Check it out and let us know in the comments what you would add to this list! xo, belle

The benefits of eating healthy, nutritious foods include having an easier time controlling your weight, experiencing better moods, developing fewer diseases and illnesses, enjoying more energy, and living a longer life. And while you can find these types of good-for-you foods in a variety of different places, some of the best options you can choose are available locally.

This is good news since a few different institutes, such as Michigan State University in the U.S., contend that eating local foods means that you not only get more flavor, but you also get more nutrients because “local food has a shorter time between harvest and your table.” This allows it to keep more of its healthier qualities, providing you the most vitamins and minerals possible.

Based on this, here are five different ways that you can eat healthily and locally:

#1: Shop at a Farmer’s Market

Most communities have some type of farmer’s market at least part of the year, allowing you to pick up some of your favourite fresh fruits and veggies, and sometimes meats, within just a few miles of your home. One major benefit of using this option is that you have some wiggle room on price as these types of venues are common for negotiating lower costs.

#2: Contact Local Growers Directly

If you happen to live in an area that does not have a farmer’s market, you can still get healthier food by contacting local growers directly. This means talking face-to-face with a farmer who raises beef cattle or meeting one-on-one with someone who has a garden big enough to support their family and yours. By buying directly from an individual person, you’re in the perfect position to ask any questions you may have about how the animals were raised or the crops were grown, increasing your knowledge of the foods (and other substances) you’re putting in your body.

#3: Grow Your Own Food

Of course, you can always grow your own food if you have an extra bit of land and want to try your hand at filling your own dinner table. This way, you control everything that goes into your food, as well as what doesn’t—like herbicides, pesticides, and any other substances you don’t want leaching into your food, and therefore your body as a result.

#4: Get to Know the Produce Manager at Your Local Supermarket

Sometimes you just want to go to one place for all of your food items, which makes getting to know your local produce manager critical to your health. He or she can tell you which foods are bought locally and which ones come from other places. Additionally, if you’re in good with this person, you’re also likely to learn about upcoming fruit and vegetable deals, making it easier to plan your menu in advance.

#5: Use Local Food In a Way that Enhances Its Nutritional Value

Following this suggestion means not only getting your produce and/or meat locally but also preparing it in a way that allows you to get as many nutrients out of it as you possibly can. For instance, you could juice your fruits and vegetables, enabling you to get all of the high-quality vitamins and minerals they contain. Another option is to freeze any excess foods that are seasonal so you have access to their nutritious goodness all year long.

When you eat healthily and locally, it’s good for your body as well as the local economy. That makes it the best case scenario for your health and your pocketbook!